Residential Design

VOL.2 2018

A business-to-business magazine focused on the collaborative process and talented work of residential architects and custom homebuilders.

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Clockwise from opposite page: The L-shaped façade is offset to optimize outdoor spaces. Board-formed concrete, cedar, glass, and steel were the big splurges for the feature wall and stair. A flex space off the main entry relieves some burden from the main living area. The stair plinth provides display space for decorative objects; the stair treads are walnut on a single steel stringer. make room for a gated main entrance through the south-facing side yard con- taining a small pool and fountain. "The gate leads you into this pastoral courtyard, and you encounter the front door once you're in that courtyard," says Yanai. "It was a way to layer in openness to nature and light but maintain privacy from the street. The exterior experience extends far deeper into the site than if you just had a big box." Nearly every design decision was focused on creating the illusion of con- tinuity between interior and exterior. Inside, the foyer faces a flex room—a combination TV/music/guest lounge— that can be pocketed off. Its glass exterior wall brings in light and views of a contemplative side garden. "We're not throwing away the side yard, even if it's just 4 or 5 feet wide," Yanai says. Turn 90 degrees to the left, and you're facing the main living area, where several exquisitely executed moves elevate it to the realm of art. One is the board- formed concrete—first encountered in the entry courtyard—that creates an elegant, three-step platform at the base of the stairs. It turns back, letting one experience the space from different directions, before wrapping across the entire south wall and shooting out into the backyard. "It's a feature wall where we con- centrated the finances and energy of the project," Yanai says. Inset with maple casework, it borrows the Japanese con- cept of tokonoma, or display space. "In a Japanese house it's much more discreet 57 VOL. 2, 2018 RESIDENTIALDESIGNMAGA ZINE.COM

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