Residential Design

Vol 4, 2017

A business-to-business magazine focused on the collaborative process and talented work of residential architects and custom homebuilders.

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in the modern manner we've all come to appreciate. In this house, a covered gable porch overlooking the pool extends its volume back inside to the living room and dining room. The steel structure that supports it continues inside as well. On the interior, the steel beam recesses are infilled with wood. "The wood helps keep the modern warm," says Pi. "You'll see mahogany nosing up to steel or lining the underside of soffits. It's a little surprise at close range." "We like to blend the industrial materials with more natural hand-shaped materials," Ira observes. Polished concrete floors cover the kitchen and living room, while two steps up, wood floors line the dining room and central passage along the kitchen to the entry. Wood-paneled ceilings appear throughout, as do custom wood built-ins and barn doors that slide on steel tracks. "Our clients wanted the principal areas to be largely open to each other, with a certain amount of control. We actually played with some 3-D modeling to explore the degree to which the kitchen should be open or closed down," says Ira. "With all of the principal spaces, you have views back and forth. None of them feels like a confined room." Using level changes and flooring and ceiling cues to zone rooms and functions were experiments for the firm. "Since we were bringing everyone by the kitchen, we wanted everyone to feel they were going by it but are not in it," Pi explains. "It's reinforced by the soffit. All of the public rooms have the wood ceilings with the subtle gray tint. There's a secondary route to the kitchen as well—the grocery route with step down to the pantry level." The firm worked closely with interior designers dpf Design Above: Polar white stone counters, polished concrete floors, and stainless steel appliances are warmed by builder G.R. Porter's custom wood cabinetry. A pantry provides direct passage between the garage and kitchen. VOL. 4, 2017 RESIDENTIALDESIGNMAGAZINE.COM 41

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