Residential Design

VOL.6 2018

A business-to-business magazine focused on the collaborative process and talented work of residential architects and custom homebuilders.

Issue link: https://residentialdesign.epubxp.com/i/1060493

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 52 of 75

These ideas, too, were innovated from the other side of the globe. "One thing I carried with me from my time in Japan was that when you're arriving at a Japanese house, they tend to be closed in; the experience of entering is always a surprise," Allison says. "There is that about this house as well, a muteness, always looking for that sense of arrival and surprise." She adds, "The water has a symbolic connection—the Japanese concept of foreshadowing the experi- ence to come. Not until you arrive at the top step do you begin to understand the connection between the front view and the view of the water." To Scale The other part of the puzzle was mak- ing the home's 6,537 square feet feel livable. The clients, who sometimes use caterers to entertain, felt that their previous house was too small. "I might have said it was just awkward and chopped up," Allison says. She was able to reduce the square footage that the owners thought they needed by creating overlapping spaces and eliminating wasteful hallways. "One thing we try to do is have a sense of moving from space to space in a way that your sense of calm and centeredness is reinforced and you appreciate the light and nature, rather than just have a series of disruptions to your mental calm." It's a quality she became keenly aware of early on. "My mother made a comment that stuck with me all these years," Allison says. "She said she didn't like to walk into rooms where the paint color was different and sort of jarring; she thought houses should have a few good colors so that as you move from one room to the other you don't have an abrupt transition of mood. The idea is that flow and materiality can affect your mood, and how can we create spaces that help people feel centered and calm and happy?" Allison minimized the number of color changes in paint and materials to maintain a sense of calm moving through the space. 53 VOL. 6, 2018 RESIDENTIALDESIGNMAGA ZINE.COM

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Residential Design - VOL.6 2018