Residential Design

VOL.5 2018

A business-to-business magazine focused on the collaborative process and talented work of residential architects and custom homebuilders.

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have used this material," Stuart says. Initially, the crew had also installed PVC—colored gray—on the flanking rectilinear volumes, but it soon became clear that the gray surface would absorb far more heat than the white surface and could therefore become unstable. "Tem- perature rises can cause problems with PVC products," George says. "Because of the temperature differential over its lifetime, we would have had more movement than we wanted to see. We ended up using a Boral fly ash system for the gray areas." The graceful, 70-foot entry ramp was rebuilt with structural steel and ipe decking, and the sides, formerly marine plywood, were wrapped in white PVC so they look like solid masses in keeping with the architecture. The update also took advantage of today's more sophisticated glid- ing window systems. The builder installed larger expanses of cast aluminum-framed glass on the ocean side—wall-to wall this time to honor the restorative views and the original design intent. New insulation and a hydro-air heating system keep the house comfortable in the off-season. Midcentury Mood Walking into the house is like stepping into a Mad Men stage set. Original and custom-made items included in the sale were carefully restored, including in- door and outdoor furniture, a fireplace sculpture, lamps, vases, books, and a large painting by abstract expression- This page: Architect Stuart Disston had long admired the eye-catching house on visits to the area as a child. It stands in striking contrast to the Shingle-style houses in the beach community, 67 VOL. 5, 2018 RESIDENTIALDESIGNMAGA ZINE.COM

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