Residential Design

VOL.5 2018

A business-to-business magazine focused on the collaborative process and talented work of residential architects and custom homebuilders.

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The Workaround JON ANDERSON ARCHITECTURE ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. Photos: Kirk Gittings Photography Jon Anderson, FAIA, of Jon Anderson Architecture, has lived and worked on the same block in Albuquerque, N.M., for 42 years. A smart buy in 1975, while he was at his first job out of architecture school, got him a half acre and several old houses near the city's downtown. He raised his family in one of the homes and rented several others out. After he left a 12-year gig with Antoine Predock's firm in 1991, he took over one of the rentals and opened his own office. Jon's 15-person practice handles a mix of residential and commercial work, with K-12 school projects now a strong revenue stream for the office. With his children grown and launched in their own careers, Jon finally got around to designing his own modern dream house with his wife, Laura. He already had permission to tear down one of his rental houses and went about securing approv- al of his design from the Landmarks Commission, which has jurisdiction over the neighborhood. Then he hit a few snags. His concept, with its decidedly modern exterior, was rejected by the commission. It pressed for something more in keeping with the prevailing bungalow style of neighboring houses. It was a disappointment, for sure, but given his deep roots and financial commitment to the area, Jon couldn't abandon the effort. So he went back to the drawing board and designed a different house, one with a bungalow-friendly exterior and some surprising, satisfying twists. RD: You're a modern architect and wanted to build a modern house. How did your plans blow up? JA: There are two big requirements for new buildings in my neighborhood: A new house has to be of appropriate scale to surrounding buildings; and patterning of windows and doors has to be compatible with others in the area. So I did a modern house with stucco, burnished block, and metal fascias. This page: After 40 years of living on the same downtown Albuquerque block, architect Jon Anderson finally designed and built his own house there—but it was subject to stringent design review standards that required stylistic harmony with neighboring structures. 11 VOL. 5, 2018 RESIDENTIALDESIGNMAGA ZINE.COM VERBATIM

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