Residential Design

VOL.4. 2018

A business-to-business magazine focused on the collaborative process and talented work of residential architects and custom homebuilders.

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tidy, controlled form is a contrast to the wilder landscape. Walls of sliding glass doors expose the central living area, inviting views out in both direc- tions, while the solid bedroom walls are wrapped in zinc panels; mahogany win- dows and doors soften the ensemble. Not incidentally, the behind-the- scenes details are as rigorous as those on display. The roof and walls have 4 inches of continuous insulation out- board of the sheathing, and the use of non-metallic Z-girts keeps the cold from tracking through the framing. "One of the challenges was that there is not a ton of modern house-building today in Indiana," Noah says. Luckily, "our contractor, Brandt Construction, had experience with some of the more commercial materials and approaches we were interested in, such as the zinc rainscreen system." Nuanced Approach Inside, materials are refined yet simple, chosen for their durability, feel, and out- door compatibility. "We were interested in materials that show patina over time, not artificial but that have warmth and depth," Noah says. The terraces' light gray Indiana limestone pavers continue into the public spaces, where they are radiant heated and provide thermal mass in winter. "It's always great when you're able to think at all scales and use color, texture, and pattern to create an environment that works in concert with the view," he says. A dismantled factory in Gary, Indi- ana, owned by a friend of the husband's, yielded the heart pine that bookends the living area. Its knots and weathered grain add richness to both the fireplace wall and the wall inside the entryway. That wall also encircles the kitchen, where deep This page: On the other side of the fireplace wall, the master realm includes small his-and-hers workspaces. Children's bedrooms are at the opposite end of the house. 66 RESIDENTIALDESIGNMAGA ZINE.COM VOL. 4, 2018 DESIGN LAB OUTER LIMITS

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